Acceptance without Exception

This article is in response to:

The above article is aimed at Straight Allies who are maybe new to Pride, giving a run down of the do’s and don’ts.

Personally the best way to get educated is to ask questions in a sensitive and respectful way, but remember that we are there to enjoy the event so no doctors’ lists please.

On the eve of London Pride, 2018 the LGBT+ Community is gearing up for a weekend of celebrating being diverse and inclusive ranging from stage performances from singers, drag queens to street parties and of course the parade itself. Having participated and attended numerous Pride events I have witnessed the common thread of acceptance and support that runs through the event from the organisers to the attendees.

I was somewhat perturbed to come across these tweets:

I don’t by any stretch of the imagination go around my daily life on a pink cloud believing that Homophobia, Transphobia or Biphobia are nonexistent. However it may well be that unless you are part of the LGBT+ community that just because you don’t experience it doesn’t mean that it doesn’t exist.

And…

Pride for me is always been a celebration of the diversity and inclusivity; it is attended by Straight Allies and their families. Yes it is fun and colourful and necessary, how else are you going to illustrate to your children that there are many facets of life and prepare them for adulthood?

Having lived in London for the past 10 years I believe London to be cosmopolitan inclusive and accepting. However just last month I was going out for Sunday lunch with my friends and as we got on the bus a man kissed his teeth shook his head and alighted at the next stop. There was no hand holding, no PDA (Public Displays of Affection) just three men getting the bus.

When looking at Stonewall’s LGBT in Britain Hate Crime and Discrimination (2017) report it shows worrying statistics of anti LGBT+ occurrences, and remember these are statistics taken from those that are reported.

  • 1/5 LGBT+ people have experienced discrimination or hate crime in the past 12 months due to their sexual orientation/gender identity.

 

  • 2/5 Trans people have experienced discrimination or hate crime in the past 12 months due to their sexual orientation/gender identity.

 

  • 81% who experience discrimination or a hate crime do not report it to the police.

 

These are just a few of the statistics discussed in the report.

As a result of discrimination and hate crime the mental health of those affected is seriously impacted. Stonewall’s Mental Health Briefing states that:

  • 22% of Gay and Bisexual men are experiencing moderate to severe levels of depression.

 

  • This accompanied y the 79% of Lesbian and Bisexual women stating that they have felt miserable, sad or depressed in the last 12 months.

 

Members of the LGBT+ have avoided simple activities such as shopping, taking public transport or even taking a different route home in order to minimise the likelihood of being the victim of a hate crime.

Pride for me has always been a celebration of the diversity and inclusivity; it is attended by Straight Allies and their families.

Members of the LGBT+ have avoided simple activities such as shopping, taking public transport or even choosing a different route home in order to minimise the likelihood of being the target of a hate crime.

Yes the LGBT+ community now has marriage and adoption but fundamentally what we are asking for as a bare minimum is to be allowed to live without fear of others and why Pride continues to be a demonstration.

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